Elam Bonebright

Illustrator at Large

1 note

I had to delete all of the silliness on my tumblr from last night, because I realized I’d listed my tumblr under my web page on my business cards.  That being said, I don’t think there’s much harm in contributing to #reviewsdaytuesday.  

The Interrogative Mood: A Novel? is a book I had to read for postmodern lit in college, and to save a bit of pocket change I used the library copy instead of purchasing my own.  I kind of regret that decision, because it’s one of the few books you can pick up and read from any page at any time and still have no clue as to the point of its narrative, if it has one.  Sure, that sounds terrible, but the concept of a novel written entirely in questions is too strange and appealing to disregard outright.  The bread and butter of postmodernism (which I am severely oversimplifying) is challenging the traditions and patterns of context in media.  (If I put it in a museum, does placing an object in that context make it art, or does it require a higher concept?  If chapter 12 of a book happens before chapter 9, do I still read by page sequence? etc.)  Most stories read from beginning to end, growing up from a single point until you’ve experienced the whole of it.  This book is more like a rhizome, stemming from a singular concept, but growing out in a wide field of thoughts and sentiments.  You can read this book front to back, but I would recommend picking from a random point from time to time and reading from there until you’re sufficiently amused.  Make a game of answering some of the more interesting questions.  Have a conversation with book (if, by chance, you are also most talkative when your company is entirely your own).  However you choose to, please find your own way to enjoy it, because following the traditional method will only leave you frustrated.

I had to delete all of the silliness on my tumblr from last night, because I realized I’d listed my tumblr under my web page on my business cards.  That being said, I don’t think there’s much harm in contributing to #reviewsdaytuesday.  

The Interrogative Mood: A Novel? is a book I had to read for postmodern lit in college, and to save a bit of pocket change I used the library copy instead of purchasing my own.  I kind of regret that decision, because it’s one of the few books you can pick up and read from any page at any time and still have no clue as to the point of its narrative, if it has one.  Sure, that sounds terrible, but the concept of a novel written entirely in questions is too strange and appealing to disregard outright.  The bread and butter of postmodernism (which I am severely oversimplifying) is challenging the traditions and patterns of context in media.  (If I put it in a museum, does placing an object in that context make it art, or does it require a higher concept?  If chapter 12 of a book happens before chapter 9, do I still read by page sequence? etc.)  Most stories read from beginning to end, growing up from a single point until you’ve experienced the whole of it.  This book is more like a rhizome, stemming from a singular concept, but growing out in a wide field of thoughts and sentiments.  You can read this book front to back, but I would recommend picking from a random point from time to time and reading from there until you’re sufficiently amused.  Make a game of answering some of the more interesting questions.  Have a conversation with book (if, by chance, you are also most talkative when your company is entirely your own).  However you choose to, please find your own way to enjoy it, because following the traditional method will only leave you frustrated.

Filed under reviewsdaytuesday the interrogative mood